Le Petit Journal, illustrated supplement, 25 June, 1906. In 1906, Marseille, the main gateway to the colonies, was chose to hose the first ever colonial exhibition held in France. The Cambodian pavilion was based on a Khmer temple with the inspiration for the model taken from the Bayon. The result was a strange collage of architectural styles – while the face-tower used was a copy of one of Delaporte’s plaster casts that was on display from the Indo-Chinese Museum at the Trocadero, the central twoer upon which it was superimposed owed its form to Angkor wat. At the same exhibition, the French public were enthralled (as was Rodin) by the Cambodian royal dance corps that was directed by Princess Samphoudry, King Sisowath’s daughter.

Le Petit Journal, illustrated supplement, 25 June, 1906. In 1906, Marseille, the main gateway to the colonies, was chose to hose the first ever colonial exhibition held in France. The Cambodian pavilion was based on a Khmer temple with the inspiration for the model taken from the Bayon. The result was a strange collage of architectural styles – while the face-tower used was a copy of one of Delaporte’s plaster casts that was on display from the Indo-Chinese Museum at the Trocadero, the central twoer upon which it was superimposed owed its form to Angkor wat. At the same exhibition, the French public were enthralled (as was Rodin) by the Cambodian royal dance corps that was directed by Princess Samphoudry, King Sisowath’s daughter.

Le Petit Journal, illustrated supplement, 25 June, 1906. In 1906, Marseille, the main gateway to the colonies, was chose to hose the first ever colonial exhibition held in France. The Cambodian pavilion was based on a Khmer temple with the inspiration for the model taken from the Bayon. The result was a strange collage of architectural styles – while the face-tower used was a copy of one of Delaporte’s plaster casts that was on display from the Indo-Chinese Museum at the Trocadero, the central twoer upon which it was superimposed owed its form to Angkor wat. At the same exhibition, the French public were enthralled (as was Rodin) by the Cambodian royal dance corps that was directed by Princess Samphoudry, King Sisowath’s daughter.

Le Petit Journal, illustrated supplement, 25 June, 1906. In 1906, Marseille, the main gateway to the colonies, was chose to hose the first ever colonial exhibition held in France. The Cambodian pavilion was based on a Khmer temple with the inspiration for the model taken from the Bayon. The result was a strange collage of architectural styles – while the face-tower used was a copy of one of Delaporte’s plaster casts that was on display from the Indo-Chinese Museum at the Trocadero, the central twoer upon which it was superimposed owed its form to Angkor wat. At the same exhibition, the French public were enthralled (as was Rodin) by the Cambodian royal dance corps that was directed by Princess Samphoudry, King Sisowath’s daughter.

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