Oarsman, Petchaburi, Thailand 1865. During this period waterborne transport was very popular and many new canals were dug. Settlements grew up along waterways as can been seen in Thomson’s panoramas of Bangkok. In particular, where canals entered the main river, markets would develop. The major canals dug by Chinese labourers in this reign were Padung Krung Kasem, Hualampong, Maha Sawat and Pasi Charoen. These were able to take steam boats carrying rice and served as a means of public transport. The boatman strikes a dramatic pose and is dressed in the typical fashion of an ordinary person of the period. He is bare-chested and he wears simple cotton jonggraben and a pakaoma cotton belt.

Oarsman, Petchaburi, Thailand 1865. During this period waterborne transport was very popular and many new canals were dug. Settlements grew up along waterways as can been seen in Thomson’s panoramas of Bangkok. In particular, where canals entered the main river, markets would develop. The major canals dug by Chinese labourers in this reign were Padung Krung Kasem, Hualampong, Maha Sawat and Pasi Charoen. These were able to take steam boats carrying rice and served as a means of public transport. The boatman strikes a dramatic pose and is dressed in the typical fashion of an ordinary person of the period. He is bare-chested and he wears simple cotton jonggraben and a pakaoma cotton belt.

Oarsman, Petchaburi, Thailand 1865. During this period waterborne transport was very popular and many new canals were dug. Settlements grew up along waterways as can been seen in Thomson’s panoramas of Bangkok. In particular, where canals entered the main river, markets would develop. The major canals dug by Chinese labourers in this reign were Padung Krung Kasem, Hualampong, Maha Sawat and Pasi Charoen. These were able to take steam boats carrying rice and served as a means of public transport. The boatman strikes a dramatic pose and is dressed in the typical fashion of an ordinary person of the period. He is bare-chested and he wears simple cotton
jonggraben and a pakaoma cotton belt.

Oarsman, Petchaburi, Thailand 1865. During this period waterborne transport was very popular and many new canals were dug. Settlements grew up along waterways as can been seen in Thomson’s panoramas of Bangkok. In particular, where canals entered the main river, markets would develop. The major canals dug by Chinese labourers in this reign were Padung Krung Kasem, Hualampong, Maha Sawat and Pasi Charoen. These were able to take steam boats carrying rice and served as a means of public transport. The boatman strikes a dramatic pose and is dressed in the typical fashion of an ordinary person of the period. He is bare-chested and he wears simple cotton
jonggraben and a pakaoma cotton belt.

Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed.