Thomson with two Manchu Soldiers, Xiamen, Fujian in 1871. Thomson rarely appeared in his own photographs, he is seen here in Amoy (Xiamen) which was then on the southern frontier of the Qing empire. By juxtaposing himself with the Manchu soldiers, he was possibly trying to show that the city had fallen into the hands of outsiders: The Manchu and the Europeans. In 1842, the Qing government were forced to grant the British the right to trade freely in Amoy, but continued to station its own army there. All images courtesy Wellcome Library, London

Thomson with two Manchu Soldiers, Xiamen, Fujian in 1871. Thomson rarely appeared in his own photographs, he is seen here in Amoy (Xiamen) which was then on the southern frontier of the Qing empire. By juxtaposing himself with the Manchu soldiers, he was possibly trying to show that the city had fallen into the hands of outsiders: The Manchu and the Europeans. In 1842, the Qing government were forced to grant the British the right to trade freely in Amoy, but continued to station its own army there. All images courtesy Wellcome Library, London

Thomson with two Manchu Soldiers, Xiamen, Fujian in 1871. Thomson rarely appeared in his own photographs, he is seen here in Amoy (Xiamen) which was then on the southern frontier of the Qing empire. By juxtaposing himself with the Manchu soldiers, he was possibly trying to show that the city had fallen into the hands of outsiders: The Manchu and the Europeans. In 1842, the Qing government were forced to grant the British the right to trade freely in Amoy, but continued to station its own army there. All images courtesy Wellcome Library, London

Thomson with two Manchu Soldiers, Xiamen, Fujian in 1871. Thomson rarely appeared in his own photographs, he is seen here in Amoy (Xiamen) which was then on the southern frontier of the Qing empire. By juxtaposing himself with the Manchu soldiers, he was possibly trying to show that the city had fallen into the hands of outsiders: The Manchu and the Europeans. In 1842, the Qing government were forced to grant the British the right to trade freely in Amoy, but continued to station its own army there. All images courtesy Wellcome Library, London

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